Supported By
INDEXT-C
Government of Gujarat
The Building Mapping is an approach towards identifying, understanding and developing a detailed inventory for different types of Traditional and Vernacular Buildings, their Elements (Interior Architecture elements, Furniture, Objects and Accessories) as well as the Space Making Crafts (SMC) and Surface Narrative Crafts (SNC) integrated within it; spread across India. The Building Mapping is an inclusive system of recording through photographic survey, form based inventory and interviews. It is the first of its kind visual-based mapping technique in India conducted using interactive mobile tablet survey. A specific mobile application has been developed by the researchers at DICRC to conduct this survey. The data generated out of this mapping process is categorized and it is taken further in preparing an in-depth Traditional Building Portfolio (TBP), Traditional Building Elements Catalogue (TBEC) and Interactive Online Map; all being disseminated through various online platforms.

The Building Mapping has got four stages:

Mobile Application Form: In order to conduct a visual-based mapping survey through mobile or tablet, a Mobile Application Form using ODK platform is developed through the process of research, trial-error experimentation and pilot project conducted by the researchers of DICRC. The interactive form is designed to record in detail the information about numerous types of Traditional and Vernacular Buildings, their Interior Architecture elements like wall, floor, ceiling, roof, door, window, column, bracket, stair, balcony and jharokha, parapets and railings, arches, entablature, etc and Furniture elements like bed, table, storage, chair, sofa, bench, stool, partition, swing, etc. The recorded data reveal information ranging from type and location of element to materials used to the various levels of crafts and expressions involved. The Mobile Application Form can also be easily adapted for survey in different regions of the country, even though they differ in the making and expressions of the various crafts related to Interior Architecture. 

Field work and Mapping: It involves travelling extensively through various towns, villages and cities to collect data using the mobile or tablet. The process also includes photographic documentation to aid the interactive Mobile Application Form. The photography ranges from street photographs to detailed views of the interior architecture elements and furniture, along with the various craft techniques. The findings are recorded using the Form, and are immediately uploaded to dedicated server in real time from the field. The process is significant as it involves participation of the local people in gathering the data, and the process being mobile-based makes it user friendly and inexpensive in operation. The simple interface of the Form allows many more users from various fields to get involved and contribute to the data collection, which can be validated by the experts. 
 
Categorization and Inventory management: The Mapping produces comprehensive information, which consists of Images and associated data. This process uses Aggregate facility of the ODK, which helps manage the transferred data and use them in an organised way. Once the mapping data gets transmitted through the Mobile Application Form from the field, it gets delivered on to a dedicated server and is stored there. The ODK Aggregate allows the stored data to be displayed in a tabular form, and creates sections as per questions on the Form. This facilitates the study and analysis of elements and buildings, either within a single category or across various sections at the same time. ODK also enables the researchers to form analytical charts or pie diagrams to understand the mapped data. The dataset can be exported in the form of CSV files for spreadsheets or as KML files for Google Earth or Google Map, to analyse and understand the amount of data generated from the field work. This recordings could be also be transformed to Google Fusion Tables and directly be published on external systems for public viewing.

Dissemination:
The final data acts as the foundation for selection of the Traditional or Vernacular Building for detailed documentation which in turn generated Traditional Building Portfolio (TBP). Each image and its reference content are being verified and uploaded on the Interactive Online Map. This data is also used to generate an extensive Traditional Building Elements Catalogue (TBEC) which will be a comprehensive set of images and associated data about the Interior Architecture and Furniture Elements as well as objects and accessories associated with traditional and vernacular buildings. The TBP, TBEC as well as Map will be part of the Online Interactive Building Lab.Until recently, the inventories conducted for built heritage have been very nominal in nature and completely overlook its magnificence. These Traditional and Vernacular buildings are embedded with empirical knowledge systems, which include an indigenous use of materials and varied craft techniques. This imperative need of identifying and creating a detailed inventory of the prime specimens of these buildings of India gave rise to the Building Mapping project. The main intention is to create a comprehensive visual data bank about the various Interior Architecture elements, Furniture, Objects and Accessories as well as the Space Making Crafts (SMC) and Surface Narrative Crafts (SNC) related to the Traditional and Vernacular Architecture of India. This data will act as a valuable educational data to various students, craftspeople, educators, design professionals, conservationist, and all those related to the field of Art, Craft, Design and Architecture.

The region of North Gujarat comprises of the five districts situated on the northern part of the state. The districts that constitute North Gujarat are Patan, Mehsana, Banaskantha, Sabarkantha and Aravalli. There are various historic settlements within the region namely, Patan, Sidhpur, Vadnagar and Palanpur; that include many traditional houses constructed of brick and wood. The architectural style observed can be labelled as eclectic, with a strong colonial influence. The traditional houses in North Gujarat region have a typical organization with otlo and khadki leading to the chowk (courtyard) and medi (inner rooms) or main hall.

The Building Mapping within North Gujarat is an approach towards identifying, understanding and developing a detailed inventory for different types of Traditional and Vernacular Buildings, their elements (Interior Architecture elements, Furniture, Objects and Accessories) as well as the Space Making Crafts (SMC) and Surface Narrative Crafts (SNC) integrated within it; spread across the region. The project was initiated in 2010 and has been funded by Indext-C, Government of Gujarat.

Till date, the DICRC research team has mapped 10 places identifying 48 houses and 674 elements.

Till date, the DICRC research team has finished mapping at

Mehsana District
Mehsana
Vadnagar
Visnagar
Kadi

Patan District
Patan
Sidhpur
Chanasma
Radhanpur
Sami
Santalpur

The region of Central Gujarat comprises of the nine districts situated on the central part of the state. The districts that constitute Central Gujarat are Ahmedabad, Gandhinagar, Kheda, Anand, Vadodara, Mahisagar, Chota Udepur, Panchmahal and Dahod.

There are various historic settlements within the region namely, Ahmedabad, Nadiad, Vadodara and Vaso; that include many traditional houses constructed of brick and wood.

The traditional houses in Central Gujarat region have a typical organization with otlo and khadki leading to the chowk (courtyard) and medi (inner rooms) or main hall.


Till date, the DICRC research team has finished mapping at

Ahmedabad District
Viramgam
Sanand
Dholka
Kheda District
Kheda
Nadiad
Vaso
Mehmedabad

Gandhinagar District
Kalol
Mansa
Dehgam

Bharuch District
Bharuch
The region of Kutch is a land geographical extremities, with the peninsula surrounded by the Arabian Sea and the inland being a flat expanse of marshy lands bordering the great desert of Thar. Kutch, the largest district of the state of Gujarat has many settlements of interest. Within the region the built form varies from mud bhungas in the Banni region to the stone mansions in the coastal belt.

Bhungas are closely related to the desert region of Kutch known as Rann. These are single cylindrical structures built close to each other. Each bhunga houses one activity and forms one room, with many such structures combining to form a house.

The other historic settlements within the region are Bhuj, Mandvi, Lakhpat and Nakhatrana amongst many.

Till date, the DICRC research team has finished mapping at

Kutch District
Bhuj
Mandvi
Nakhatrana
Lakhpat
Dhordo
Gandhi nu Gaam
Ludiya
Bhirandiara
Tunda
Kuran
Virani
Nani Khakhar

The research project was initiated to study and comprehend the vernacular building technique called the koti-banal construction prevalent in Kumaon- Uttarakhand, India.

Kumaon is one of the two regions and administrative divisions of Uttarakhand, a mountainous state of northern India, the other being Garhwal division. It includes the districts of Almora, Bageshwar, Champawat, Nainital, Pithoragarh, and Udham Singh Nagar. Kumaoni villages consist of loosely grouped homes surrounded by farmlands. The villages are generally situated near rivers or springs, and the homes are connected by footpaths. Like hill architecture all over, the houses in Kumaon are spread out in clusters. Every house has space for cattle and storage and it’s a close -knit lifestyle with nature.

The intensions of the research included the mapping and documentation of the indigenous architecture in Kumaon, Champawat region. The study was divided in two parts, and was aimed to disseminate the treasure of knowledge that lies within. The mapping project formed part of the first trip to the region, and included preliminary research and identify houses for documentation.

This research was funded by Ms. Annemarie Pestalozzi aka Ammaji from Zurich, Switzerland and was initiated in 2009.

The project aims to identify and map the traditional building technique called the kath-khuni construction in Himachal Pradesh, India. The construction system which is prevalent in the region highlights the indigenous building practices, reflecting excellent sustainable and earthquake-resistant techniques.

The land of Himachal Pradesh rises from the plains at an altitude from 350 meters above mean sea level on the southwest to an altitude of 6816 meters in the east towards the Tibetan plateau. 64% of land area is covered with forests in Himachal Pradesh; thus, the most predominant material of construction is wood. Majority of the population is spread in small village, which appear almost ecologically planned. The settlements and built forms located along the contoured sunny slopes amidst the backdrop of hills, appear to grow out of the folds of the landscape. The landscape, materials, techniques of making, all contribute to a common formal language of settlements.

The research is a collaborative project, initiated in 2011, between researchers based in DICRC (Design Innovation and Craft Resource Centre) in the Faculty of Design, CEPT University, Ahmedabad, India and in CRIDA (Critical Research in Digital Architecture) in the Faculty of Architecture, Building & Planning, The University of Melbourne, Australia.

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